Officer Christopher Charo at the UTSA Police Department. Photo by Alex Joyer

Officer Christopher Charo is standing tall as a representative of the UTSA Police Department after competing in the Guns and Hoses boxing tournament on Saturday Oct. 10

The tournament was between the San Antonio Police Department and the San Antonio Fire Department.

Guns and Hoses is a non-profit organization dedicated to the assistance of the families of fallen police officers and firefighters, as well as the guidance of at-risk youth in the greater San Antonio area.

Despite being the competition’s first annual event to take place in the San Antonio area, there was a great turnout. The competition was hosted at the San Antonio Scottish Rite Library and Museum.  

“Most of the proceeds went to the 100 Club for fallen officers, fallen firefighters and people injured in the line of duty,” Charo said.

Additionally, the organization plans to open a non-profit boxing gym where both firefighters and police officers would coach at-risk youth.

Charo spent two months training at Ringside Boxing in San Antonio, where he trained alongside several firefighters.  

With a notorious rivalry between the police officers and firemen, the two departments came together for a greater cause.

“It was the best experience to see what they get to go through. If something happens to them, we feel it too,” Charo said.

Having never boxed before, he was challenged both physically and mentally.

“The workout routine was intense,” Charo said.

“We would work out in the morning for two and a half hours doing cardio and bag work and then return at night to do sparring matches with each other.”

With the support of his family and the UTSA Police Department, Charo fought a tough battle and represented UTSA well

“To hear them say the University of Texas-San Antonio Police Department, it showed a lot of people that we are out here. It was one of the biggest reasons I chose to compete,” Charo explained.  

Having the support of the police chief and fellow police officers, Charo felt both immense pressure and satisfaction.

“Once I got out there, all of the nerves went away, and I had tunnel vision on my opponent,” Charo said on the feeling of fighting in front of the crowd.

Despite losing the match, Charo still plans to compete in the future, knowing that the greater victory is outside the ring.

“I’m hoping some other UTSA police officers decide to compete,” Charo said.

Until then, he is more than proud to represent UTSA.

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