The start of a college career can be a daunting time. There are decisions to be made, classes to take and plenty of other responsibilities that can make these challenges overwhelming. The best way to conquer this feeling is to be informed.

If you don’t understand the material that is being taught in class, ask a question. If you’re unsure of what classes you need to take, go to advising. If you don’t know what you want to do with your degree, do some research to determine your options.

However, your search for knowledge shouldn’t be restricted only to college matters. As an adult, you should keep yourself informed in other subjects as well.

Since most of you entering UTSA in the fall are of voting age, it’s crucial that you keep yourself informed about the issues.

First of all, you should know where and how you can register to vote. Once you’re registered, keep up with candidates running for the presidency, the senate and regional elections. Know where they stand on key issues. That’s not to say that you must know every detail about every candidate, though.

Also, keep yourself informed about new laws and bans, for example, the law prohibiting texting while driving or the ban on smoking in San Antonio bars, bingo and pool halls. The smoking ban will go into effect on Aug. 19, 2011.

There are still many subjects that students should be informed about. Some can be as important as housing issues or as basic as finding out how to get a library card.

Search for insights on new topics. Don’t assume that you know all there is to know about anything.

The Paisano can help you with your search. This newspaper covers issues that relate to UTSA, whether they involve academics, athletics or any other issue relevant to our university community.

Read the newspaper weekly and let us what you think. 

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