The upcoming election hasn’t captured the attention of UTSA students.

Take for example, the lack of student interest when mid-term political candidate representatives as well as judicial candidates filled the Sombrilla last week. The speakers looked out into an area that was about as empty as a lecture classroom on a Monday morning. Students entered the Sombrilla and just kept walking.

The most appalling part of the event was that most people just walked by leaving the bipartisan cronies in the dust. It’s bad enough that few students can name their Student Government president is. It’s even sadder that people still believe their current U.S. president is Muslim. Still, despite the noticeable lack national media coverage of midterm elections, I think it’s fairly important to stay up to date on the local authorities running for office.

Texas seems to like the perception that it prefers Christian, Caucasian and non-slave owning history textbooks. Of course it’s those types of laws that the public complains about after they have been enacted. Whoops.

When the textbook committee made the final decision Texas residents had very little response. Maybe that’s really what the American people want. Our national polls today are answered by a small percent of population – at best. The major media networks run hundreds of polls each day to provide what they believe to be a logical representation of American’s opinions.

This year UTSA students seem to be more interested in complaining about the recent cutbacks in shuttle transportation. There were so many factors in the result of that survey but the fact remains that student response is lacking.

Students make large efforts to inquire about their financial aid. Maybe it’s the idea that since it’s their money it is worth keeping watch over.

It’s ironic then that UTSA student regard money given to them from the government with such value and not other important things as well – such as that is running our government.

Related Stories

More from Paisano1

Editorial Board

At the University of Missouri, real change happened — but only when loss of university revenue was threatened. Missouri student…

More In Opinion

Editorial Board

“Democracy dies in darkness.” This phrase is enshrined in the masthead of the Washington Post. While democracy is kept alive…