UTSA Animal Rights Club members interviewing students on their knowledge of veganism. Ben Shirani/The Paisano

The UTSA Animal Rights club tabled on Tuesday morning under the Sombrilla plaza, giving away stuffed animals and promoting healthy choices for students and their environments.

“We are out here promoting veganism, helping get the idea out there,” said

, UTSA Animal Rights Club member and volunteer, at the club’s booth near McKinney Humanities Building.

Next to the Animal Rights Club was a Planned Parenthood booth. Both were giving away swag in exchange for student time listening to pitches.

Schreiber casually interviewed junior environmental science major Jasper Klein in front of a white board boasting facts and figures about veganism:

“True or false?” Schreiber asked: “World Hunger is caused by a shortage of food?”

“False,” said Klein.

Schreiber confirmed the response was correct and after the three question quiz gave the participant a stuffed animal.

Schreiber went on to explain that veganism is not about cutting things out of your life but rather applying humanitarian ideals to all living things:

“It’s just the way that they are grown and the way that they are treated in the factory farms is horrific, and I don’t want to be a part of that.”

Schreiber highlighted some of the downsides to consuming animal-based products and noted that 56 billion animals are killed for every animal-based product every year. Schreiber also explained some of the benefits of veganism to human health and the health environment.

According to Schreiber, among the benefits of a vegan lifestyle are a lower rate of obesity and lower rates of heart disease and cancer.

The UTSA Animal Rights Club tabling event also displayed statistics showing the amount of water used to grow vegetables is significantly lower than the amount of water used to raise animals for consumption.

“Two hundred sixty-four gallons of water are used to grow two pounds of grain, like cereal, while it takes approximately 11,000 gallons of water to make two pounds of beef,” Schreiber explained.

Energy, another important factor in environmental policy, has a significant role in the Animal Rights Club campaign event to promote the veganism and raise awareness for the rights of animals.

“Every trophic level you are getting less and less energy, so you are going to have to eat more meat to get more energy. So, if you just start with the producers (plants), you are going to get the most energy out of your food.”

The event staff said finding vegan food in San Antonio is not difficult; the majority of what they eat can be found at local grocery stores including Walmart, Target and H.E.B.

Referring to going vegan Schreiber said to, “Put it into your conscious. It’s not hard. I’ve been doing it for four years now, and I have a lot of friends that have been doing it their whole life. As soon as you find the foods that you like and are vegan, you’re good.”

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