On the second floor of the Convocation Center just behind the concession stand at the north end there is an area where one can sit and enjoy a concession purchase while still being able to hear the action below.  The area is decorated with team photos honoring those teams that have brought home conference championships in recent years.  

There is something missing, though. Nowhere on the photos does it say who was on the team or how they did that season.  The photos are there, but there is no information about the teams in the photo.  The only way one can identify the team is by the backdrop or the uniforms.  

While that works for giving people something to look at while they eat their way through nachos or popcorn, it leaves something to be desired for someone who might want to know more about the history of UTSA athletics.

There is only one way to properly honor UTSA’s history, and that is with a museum/hall of fame.

The museum could be a place where people could look at the football that was used to kick off the first Roadrunner game.  The museum would also be a place where the trophies and awards that UTSA has received for its great moments in sports could be displayed.

You would be able to see the uniform that the men’s basketball team wore when they won their first conference title in 1999, the one they wore last season when they won the first NCAA tournament game in school history.  

Some of these artifacts that have shaped our university could be found in a UTSA museum.   

The museum would not just be a sports museum; it would also hold important pieces of the UTSA story.  The first catalog of classes could be on display right next to a copy of the legislation that gave UTSA life in the 60s.

In addition to a museum there should also be a UTSA Hall of Fame where the people who put the betterment of the university ahead of themselves could be honored and remembered.  UTSA has had enough people who have left noticeable impacts to warrant a hall of fame inclusion for their tireless work.

The Hall of Fame could be subdivided either by decade or by department, but the number one goal of the hall would be to celebrate the people who made the biggest impact in shaping our university.

The first step in having a museum at UTSA would be finding a location.  One option could be to turn the lower floor of the Institute of Texan Cultures into the UTSA museum/hall of fame.  Or perhaps instead of another Starbucks, the university could place the museum in the new parking garage being built next to the Main Building.

Wherever it is placed, the museum will grow as the story of UTSA grows.  That means it may need a building of its own, which could be where the community comes in.

A UTSA museum/hall of fame would be a place where people could gather to look at artifacts that have shaped this university as well as a place where the story of UTSA could be told to future generations of Roadrunners. 

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