More than 1,500 students visited the “Fall Into Your Major” event organized by Heidi Sawyer, career counselor for the University College, in collaboration with academic advising and AIS. The event was held Oct. 14, in the HEB UC.

“This event is targeted for freshmen and sophomores — especially students who are undecided — but also for students who would like to inquire about a major or certification,” said Stefanie Cisneros, a career counselor for student athletes. According to Cisneros, the idea of placing career counselors, advisors and staff in one place was intended to help students become more informed.

Tables were set up by UTSA colleges — including the Honors College and the University College — as well as departments, academic advisors, career counselors and organizations (such as the Thomas Riverá Center), testing services, peer mentors and ROTC. Each department offered information about available majors, minors and certificates.

The majority of the tables were for the College of Liberal and Fine Arts (COLFA).

Many tables offered incentives for students to stop and talk: some had candy, some had highlighters and others had interesting objects that represented their department.

For example, the Department of Anthropology brought a skeleton it calls “Fontica”; the Department of Physics and Astronomy had a Newton’s Cradle, reflective telescope, plasma ball and a fiber optics lamp; and the Modern Languages Department had a little circle of various flags from around the world.

One of the most popular tables among students was that of the department of philosophy and classics.

Marshall Maylor, a philosophy graduate student, presented students with intriguing hypothetical situations.

Once he had their attention, he would recommend taking at least one philosophy class.

“If you like it, it may be your new major,” said Maylor.

“If not, it was just another boring class.” Many students named that table as their favorite.

“Many tables were just signing our papers for AIS,” admitted freshman Kiana Wheeler.

“But Mr. Maylor gave us scenarios and only signed our paper if we answered or participated.”

Many AIS instructors either required their students to come to the event or promised extra credit in exchange for proof of attendance in the form of signatures from various tables.

“It’s been helpful,” said Wheeler, “and I’m glad I came — even though I wouldn’t have if it wasn’t required by my AIS class.”

Cisneros was excited by the increase in participation:

“Compared to last spring, I’ve seen more participation from students, and also from the colleges and departments to commit to showing up for the event.”

The “Fall Into Your Major” event was the second of its kind and was preceded by “March Into Your Major”.

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