News(graphic stimulate-learning)-marcusconnolly

For bold students interested in spicing up their fall semester schedules, UTSA offers a variety of interesting courses.

Unique in content, and available during the Fall 2014 semester, courses such as Walt Disney & Popular Culture (HUM 3703), Bible as Literature (HUM 3223), Dictator in Latin American Literature (SPN 4303) and Women and Literature: Crime & Modern Fiction (ENG 3133) invite UTSA students to examine the relationship between sociocultural milieu and creative works.

In addition to satisfying upper-division requirements, courses such as Geological Field Investigations (GEO 3112), Fundamentals of Robotics (ME 4773) and Honors Seminar: Neuroscience of the Human Voice (HON 3253) foster innovation through an emphasis on the application and critical analysis of course materials.

As well as providing courses that strengthen critical thinking skills, UTSA offers introductory dance and courses in photography, drawing, ceramics, sculpting and painting for non-art majors that encourage creative ingenuity. These class experiences—unique to UTSA—reflect the university’s professors and student community.

Walt Disney & Popular Culture (HUM 3703)

Professor Douglas Brode will teach Walt Disney & Popular Culture (HUM 3703) on Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at the Main Campus. This special topics course analyzes Walt Disney’s influence on popular culture. To enroll in Walt Disney & Popular Culture, students must have completed the 2012-2014 core curriculum requirement in rhetoric.

Bible as Literature (HUM 3223)

Dr. James Adair will teach Bible as Literature (HUM 3223), a course that examines the Bible in a secular context, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. at the Main Campus. This course challenges its students to read beyond any emotional, personal and theological understandings of the Bible. The Bible as Literature acts not only as an experiment of religious empathy but also as an exercise in critical thinking and academic understanding of ancient literature and history.

Dictator in Latin American Literature (SPN 4303)

Dr. Santiago Daydi-Tolson will teach Dictator in Latin American Literature (SPN 4303) on Mondays from 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. at the Main Campus. This Spanish special topics course focuses on the rhetorical construction of the “dictator” by Latin American authors, considering possible social and political motivations or constraints that may have shaped an author’s portrayal of a dictator. As a rigorous study of Latino culture and Latin American literary themes, this course fulfills the College of Liberal and Fine Arts’ signature experience. To enroll in Dictator in Latin American Literature, students must have either completed Advanced Reading (SPN 3043) or receive Dr. Daydi-Tolson’s consent.

Women and Literature: Crime & Modern Fiction (ENG 3133)

Dr. Cailin Copan-Kelly will teach Women and Literature: Crime & Modern Fiction (ENG 3133) on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. at the Main Campus. Using critical literary and feminist theory, this new literature course will analyze the presentation of women in the crime and modern fiction genres. To enroll in this course, students must have completed the 2012-2014 core curriculum requirement in literature.

Honors Seminar: Neuroscience of the Human Voice (HON 3253)

Dr. Donald Robin will teach the Honors Seminar: Neuroscience of the Human Voice (HON 3253) on Wednesdays from 1 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. at the Main Campus. This course explores the neurological and psychological facets of human vocalization, particularly research of sensory-motor control and voice disorders. To enroll in this course, students must contact the UTSA Honors College. Students interested in Honors Seminar: Neuroscience of the Human Voice may ask their advisor if the course can be substituted for an upper-division elective in their major or minor.

Geological Field Investigations (GEO 3112)

Dr. Ethan Lake will teach Geological Field Investigations (GEO 3112) on Fridays from noon to 4 p.m. at the Main Campus. In this course, students learn geology field procedures, as well as identification and analyitical skills. Half-day and Saturday field trips are course requirements. To enroll in Geological Field Investigations, students must have completed either Introduction to Earth Systems Laboratory (GEO 1111) or Earth History Laboratory (GEO 1131).

Ballet I (DAN 1013)

Professor Megan Rulewicz will teach Ballet I (DAN 1013) on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. at the Main Campus. Ms. Rulewicz has a master’s degree in ballet in addition to experience in artistic and professional performance and ballet choreography. For students, no previous dance experience is required. This introductory course familiarizes students with basic ballet positions and terminology. UTSA offers Ballet II and Ballet III as well as modern and contemporary jazz dance. Courses are offered at both UTSA teaching campuses.

If you would like to season your fall semester with a critical thinking challenge or a creative endeavor, visit asap.utsa.edu for full course information and registration.

Related Stories

More from Miriam C. Cabello/ Staff Writer

Editorial Board

At the University of Missouri, real change happened — but only when loss of university revenue was threatened. Missouri student…

More In News

Alejandro Lopez Co-News Editor

UTSA fraternities and sororities collected clothing donations for Sigma Pi’s 8th annual clothing drive on April 7 at Aspen Heights.…