student show

Across from the Recital Hall in the Art Building sits the “XXVIII Student Exhibition” where UTSA’s very own artists have presented their thoughts and inspirations though various media for visitors to see. There are 46 pieces in total and many are for sale. The gallery itself is organized by themes, moods, colors, subjects and style.

For many of the students, it is required to submit their work as this is a great opportunity to get their name out and let people see their talents.

Senior art major Kara Stevens explained her inspiration and process behind the creation of “The Alleviation Machine, ” a sculpture that won best in show.

“It’s a fun piece; all my stuff is very surreal. It’s fun and yet serious all at the same time. When people look at it they’re kind of like ‘Bizarre!'” Stevens said, while seated on her sculpture.

“This piece is about my friend with Ménière’s disease (An inner ear infection that causes migraines, among other symptoms). I wanted to create this piece where the viewer can go behind the sculpture and look in the exact mold of her (Kara’s friend) ear. I have this big horn thing shooting out, which is kind of her ear canal. And it shows my hand holding a migraine pill,” Stevens said.

One of the interesting factors of the piece is that the viewer can sit on the stool provided and interact with the sculpture.

“The piece plays circus music. And you can turn different stuff on it, like the handle or play with the hose–you can also honk the horn,” Kara said.

Much of Stevens work creates a conversation about the human condition. As one of three pieces in the exhibit, “The Alleviation Machine” is no different.

“My pieces are very psychological and about human issues. Where human issues are very serious in real life I kind of make them fun in art,” Kara said.

Many of the featured artists at the exhibit work for weeks on end before the exhibition and each one has earned its place. With 34 students contributing artists, there is a wide variety of mediums that were used to create this exhibit.

Among them “The Good Book,” by Michael Austin Heuszel and “Memory,” by Ray Perez are two additional pieces that require the viewer to walk around and get up close to appreciate the fine detail put into them. Having these kinds of pieces engages the viewer and draws them further into what this exhibit has to offer. There are many pieces that are showcased, and each is different from the next-but they are carefully placed so that when walking through the exhibition viewers are lead from one piece to the next. without an abrupt shift in mood.

From controversial portraits to very personal sculptures, this exhibition is a must-see and will only be open through April 22. So be sure to stop by, because not only is it here on campus, but it’s also free for UTSA students.

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