Rocky Horror Show

The cult classic “Rocky Horror Picture Show” (RHPS) has been interpreted many times since its debut in 1975. Over time, the film proved that fishnet stockings and bejeweled costumes can never really go out of style. Beginning next week, fans of the film can rejoice as the musical performance of RHPS starts at the Woodlawn Theatre.

The production features Sharon Needles, winner of the fourth season of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” in the lead role of Frank-N-Furter. Needles, a popular contestant on “Drag Race,” will be put on the signature red lipstick and put her moves to the test. This will be the third time Woodlawn Theatre has featured “Rocky Horror” on their playbill.

Now with the newest revival of the Broadway musical set to premiere in San Antonio on Oct. 4, it’s time to look back on how this phenomenon has danced its way into fans’ hearts.

“I would like, if I may, to take you on a strange journey,” the narrator begins. It’s a strange journey as the story ventures into a world of flamboyant characters and memorable dance sequences.

The plot of the film follows newlywed couple, Brad Majors (Barry Bostwick) and Janet Weiss (Susan Sarandon) on their adventure through Dr. Frank-N-Furter’s (Tim Curry) bizarre world of transvestites and show tunes. The electric cast and song choice have made this film a fan favorite. The version that Woodlawn has chosen is expected to be similar to the hit film.

After they are stranded with a flat tire on a stormy night, the couple takes refuge in the castle of Frank-N-Furter, a proclaimed transvestite from Transsexual Transylvania . Throughout the bizarre night, the newlyweds are forced to witness the birth of Frank-N-Furter’s human creation Rocky Horror and deal with Frank-N-Furter’s celebration of the Annual Transylvanian Convention. As Brad and Janet struggle to survive this wild night, they are challenged to uphold their morals when Frank-N-Furter pushes their limits of sexuality.

This risqué film did not have a massive following until its midnight screening in New York in 1976. Following its release in 1975, midnight screenings grew in popularity around the country. Viewers would show up in drag based on RHPS’s main character Frank-N-Furter. The fans morphed the film into the phenomenon that it is today.

In the 70s, parents ridiculed the film for its provocative nature, themes of free love, drug use and highly sexualized characters. However, fans of the flick argued that this experimentation defined the counter culture at the time.

Today, the film celebrates its 37th anniversary and still plays at some theatres. Locally, the Alamo Drafthouse screens the film on the third Thursday of each month at its Park North location.

Those who are planning to attend the theatrical adaptation can expect to be awed by the special effects featured in the performance. According to Woodlawn spokesperson Robby Vance, “the audience can look forward to amazing on-stage lighting, a live motorcycle, call-backs, prop bags (available for $5) and special merchandize for sale. Sharon Needles will also be flown in one scene.”

The latest version of the play is directed by Woodlawn’s artistic director Greg Hinojosa and will be shown exclusively at the Woodlawn Theatre.

 Tickets can be purchased for $35, and VIP packages are available for $50. VIP packages are a special treat for die-hard fans of the show “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” After the show, guests will have the opportunity to meet with Ms. Needles. 

Due to the language and adult situations, children under the age of 15 will not admitted without an adult present.

The Rocky Horror Show is scheduled to run from Oct. 4 to Oct. 27 at the Woodlawn Theatre (located at 1920 Fredericksburg Rd., 78201). For show times or more information, visit

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