TSA’s Extended Education hosts GRE, GMAT, SAT and LSAT test taking preparation workshops available for all students, faculty and UTSA alumni. The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is a standardized test that often seems daunting to prospective students. These workshops offered are designed to teach students to beat the patterns of the test.

“The LSAT is a challenging test, but it is very standardized, very beatable,” Adam Johnson said. “You can learn the patterns, and you can beat the patterns.”

Johnson is the founder and instructor for Lonestar Education, a firm contracted to teach the test preparation workshops for Extended Education (ExtEd). According to Johnson, because the test is so standardized these workshops are successful.

“The biggest myth about the test is that it’s a test of intelligence; it’s absolutely not. It’s a test of skill,” Johnson said.

At the Institute for Law & Public Affairs located on Main Campus, students can meet with Lisa Buentello, a designated pre-law advisor and the director of the institute. “Take advantage of formal preparations,” recommends Buentello, who took the LSAT without taking part in any such workshops, and her initial score reflected it.

“Stronger LSAT scores will definitely translate into more opportunity as far as law schools you can gain admission to; it also directly translates into scholarship dollars.”

– Lisa Buentello

Director of the Institute for Law and Public Affiars

“Stronger LSAT scores will definitely translate into more opportunity as far as law schools you can gain admission to; it also directly translates into scholarship dollars,” she said. “Many programs can help you, but if you’re not putting in the effort, writing a check isn’t going to help you on the test.”

That check, when written for the UTSA ExtEd LSAT workshop, will be about half as costly compared to outside preparation workshops, says Johnson. Aside from being a fraction of the cost, students can expect to receive a few other UTSA ExtED exclusives.

“The classes are small by design, and the instructor developed the program himself. He’s in a better position to tailor (the program) to individual students’ needs and recognize the strengths and weaknesses of each individual.” This small class feel is often lost when using larger LSAT programs designed for the national audience, says Buentello. Johnson believes a contributing factor to the success of the workshops is the sense of community which is often only felt in small class sizes.

Johnson has a master’s degree in education. He taught LSAT workshops and how to beat the patterns before taking the test himself. He received a perfect score of 180. By working to recognize and outsmart the format of the test, students of the workshop receive rewarding results.

“If you approach this as an intelligence test, that’s a barrier to improvement,” Johnson said. “I really believe you can get any score you want.” Learning and refining test-taking-skills, not preconceived notions of personal intelligence, will aid in receiving promising scores on this test.

The LSAT workshops began Saturday, Nov. 4 and will continue to be held every Tuesday through Jan. 30 skipping the week of Dec. 25. These workshops  are located on the Main Campus, and there will be another session beginning in April. To register or for more information contact UTSA Extended Education.

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